The World According to Bugs #3 by Carlos and Joseph Najera

My mother was diagnosed with TB shortly after I was born. That was in 1947. In 1950 she was placed in the Maryknoll Hospital in Monrovia, California. Lonely and feeling helpless, my father sent these post cards almost every day to my mom. To the best of my ability I placed these cards in chronological order.

bugs

Xochtl is my sister, Christina. The word is Aztec meaning flower. She was twelve when I was born and during the time my mom was away she took care of me.

Temperatures in the Imperial Valley can reach 120°. On the city streets where the sunlight and the buildings reflect the heat it can get much hotter than that. This was June and it was just the beginning of it.

We had a swamp cooler to help cool the house down. People still use them to this day. My parents lived through the Great Depression. They did not run it for very long stretches of time. You know, saving the cost of electricity. We had only one fan in the house. Only my mama could use it. My brother and I shared our bed. In the summer time we only had a sheet to cover ourselves, but by morning I usually woke up with just me and my PJs.

 

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About jedwardnajera

I am a Poet. I live the life of a poet. I am an artist, a member of Gallery 9 in Los Altos, California. I published a novel Nena the Fairy and the Iron Rose, available through Amazon Books. I spent over thirty five years in a classroom. My father kept a living record of his lifetime as he lived through the Twentieth Century. He was born in 1908 and almost lived long enough to see us enter the new millennium. He was a mechanical engineer and had a wonderful love of history and science. He entrusted to me nearly 400 pages that he wrote through the years. He wrote in Spanish and I have spent six months translating these pages into English. Now I am in the process of editing, rewriting, and revising them. I am trying to post a new entry or chapter each Friday. Check in on us at least once a week for the latest post.
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